Powershell: Share size reporting

A security admin came to me the other day and asked me if I could measure the size of each individual share on the system. I asked him if this wasn’t something most easily done by using Explorer, but since he wanted every single share on all file servers, it would a lot of “right click->Properties”, so I took pitty on him and got to work 😉

I created a script where you’re asked the name of the file server. The script then lists out the shares and writes out their individual size to a text file.

Here’s the script:

This script takes a long time to complete in large environments. If anyone has tips on how to streamline the code for better performance, please add a comment 🙂

Automating best pratice for security groups in Active Directory

In order to maintain best practices in a multi domain forest, we occasionally have to create file and application access groups to secure sensitive resources we manage. Creating a 3 groups to do this is a lot of hassle, but it needs to be done, however you don’t need to do it manually.

I created a script to take care of this day to day task for me. The script basically does 3 thing:

  1. It checks if a security group with that name already exists and if so it aborts.
  2. It creates 3 security groups: a “Domain Local” group for rights assignment, a “Global” group to put my users in, and a “Universal” group to link the Global and Domain Local groups, as well as to link groups from other domains in our forest.
  3. It asks the user what folder to add rights to and what rights to add (Read, Write and/or Modify) and then sets those rights on the appropriate folder.

The script uses Quest Active Roles AD Management snapin for Powershell (available here)

I’ve added logging using the transcript functionality, and if you check out line 19 and 114 you see that I’m starting and stopping logging to a specific file using the “Start-Transcript” and “Stop-Transcript” cmdlets. This means that the script will throw and error in ISE since it doesn’t support transcripting, but running it in a normal powershell windows will ensure that everything happing between line 15 to 113 get’s logged!

Without further ado, heres the script:

 

I still consider myself a novice at Powershell, however and advanced one at that, and I’d love to get feedback on better approaches to my scripting, both in the sense of optimizing the script for performance, and simplifying the script itself. I’d also be happy to answer any questions regarding the script 🙂